Customer Journeys Articles & Videos

  • Service Blueprints: How to Choose What Experience to Visualize

    Start with a small-to-medium experience, that is known to be problematic, comes with existing data, will be redesigned soon, and that you can control.

  • The Practice of Customer-Journey Management

    User journeys should be managed like products — by people and teams with specialized, journey-dedicated roles who continually research, measure, optimize, and orchestrate the experience.

  • Three Levels of Pain Points in Customer Experience

    Pain points are problems that occur at the different levels of the customer experience: interaction level, customer-journey level, or relationship level.

  • Collaboration in the Omnichannel Experience

    Collaboration is one of the 5 key components of omnichannel user experience. Collaboration between normally disparate devices or channels creates new ways to interact.

  • A Framework for CX Transformation: How to Operationalize CX at Scale

    To deliver high-quality omnichannel experiences, companies must develop an operational ecosystem that enables crossfunctional collaboration and quick reaction to customers’ needs.

  • Asset Mapping for Experience Consistency

    Asset maps display and organize the screens and elements users encounter along workflows and journeys. They provide a systematic way of analyzing the consistency of an organization’s experience across channels.

  • Getting Started with Journey Mapping: 27 Tips from Practitioners

    Set yourself up for journey-mapping success by educating yourself on the basics, defining objectives, building a crossfunctional team, collaborating on the map, and optimizing your presentation.

  • Companies on Social Media: 6 Types of User Interactions with Business

    Users rely on social media to find out about new products or companies, conduct research, engage with content, make purchases, and seek customer support.

  • Refine, Remodel, Rebuild: 3 Strategies for Experience Improvement

    To improve customer experience, solutions range from low to high investment and impact, based on budget, risk tolerance, readiness, and unmet needs.

  • A Guide to Service-Blueprinting Workshops

    Service-blueprinting workshops require thoughtful planning and hands-on facilitation.

  • Orchestration in the Omnichannel Experience

    One of the 5 key components of a successful omnichannel user experience, orchestration creates a personalized customer journey.

  • Service Blueprinting: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    The structure and format of a collaborative spreadsheet makes it an effective tool for virtual service blueprinting.

  • How to Run a Journey-Mapping Workshop: A Step-by-Step Case Study

    How to design a journey-mapping workshop that leads participants through current-state assumption mapping, pain-point identification, and future-state visioning.

  • Journey-Mapping Approaches: 2 Critical Decisions To Make Before You Begin

    Before beginning any journey-mapping initiative, teams must decide between (1) a current-state or future-state map, and (2) an assumption-first or research-first approach. A hybrid approach for each decision works well for most teams.

  • Journey Mapping: 2 Decisions to Make Before You Begin

    Customer journey maps come in two flavors: current-state and future-state mapping. Mapping can be based on hypotheses or on real user data.

  • 7 Ways to Analyze a Customer-Journey Map

    Evaluate your journey map to identify low and high points, failures to set expectations, unnecessary or too long steps, channel transitions, and moments of truth. Use this information to find opportunities for improving the journey.

  • Service Blueprinting: Fails and Fixes

    The most common pain points with service blueprinting are setting expectations, determining scope, and communicating insights, according to 97 UX professionals.

  • Foundational UX Workshop Activities

    There are 7 activities that act as a foundation for every UX exercise during a workshop or collaborative team meeting. By understanding these, you can create almost any other exercise you need.

  • CX vs. UX

    Customer Experience (CX) and User Experience (UX) are two common terms that mostly mean the same thing, but have different connotations. Whatever your preferred term, it's important to consider design at 3 levels of experience.

  • Service Blueprinting: Top Questions Answered

    Service blueprints are the primary tool for service design, but practitioners often misunderstand how they relate to journey mapping, who should be involved in the process, and how to sell their value to the organization.

  • Journey Mapping: 2 Decisions to Make Before You Begin

    Customer journey maps come in two flavors: current-state and future-state mapping. Mapping can be based on hypotheses or on real user data.

  • CX vs. UX

    Customer Experience (CX) and User Experience (UX) are two common terms that mostly mean the same thing, but have different connotations. Whatever your preferred term, it's important to consider design at 3 levels of experience.

  • Why Service Design

    A service design perspective is needed to avoid fragmenting the long-term customer experience by individual (but uncoordinated) touchpoints, provided by siloed internal teams.

  • Scenario Mapping for Design Exploration

    When you are in the early stages of designing a user experience flow, use scenario mapping to work out how different personas will use the proposed design to solve their tasks.

  • How to Conduct Research for Customer Journey Mapping

    When conducting research for customer-journey maps, use qualitative methods that allow direct interaction with or observation of users, such as interviews, field studies, and diary studies.

  • Designing for Friction and Flow in Customer Journeys

    Friction and Flow are two concepts in interaction design that assist users in their tasks, whether this is to prevent errors or to encourage completion. As designers, it's important to use both as and when required in the user journey. This video explains when you might need to consider adding friction into the user journey.

  • How to Create a UX Storyboard

    How storyboards fit within the UX design process, and the steps needed to make a successful storyboard to visualize a workflow, customer journey, or user story.

  • Peak–End Rule: Use to Your Advantage

    Users largely judge their experience with your product or service on two data points: the peak and the end.

  • The Availability Heuristic

    People make decisions based on the information that is most readily available to them. Understanding how the availability heuristic works will help you design for the way people think.

  • 5 Steps for Effective Diary Studies in Customer Journey Research

    Diary studies are a longitudinal research method used to understand user interactions at different touchpoints, which is especially useful for omnichannel user research. Participants record their reactions as experiences unfold throughout the customer journey.

  • 4 Key Components of Service Blueprints

    A service blueprint visualizes the relationships between different service components — people, props, and processes. Four key elements comprise a framework for service blueprinting that can be scaled to any scope or timeline.

  • The 5 Steps to Customer Journey Mapping

    Journey maps combine two powerful instruments—storytelling and visualization—in order to help teams understand and address customer needs.

  • Service Blueprints: How to Choose What Experience to Visualize

    Start with a small-to-medium experience, that is known to be problematic, comes with existing data, will be redesigned soon, and that you can control.

  • The Practice of Customer-Journey Management

    User journeys should be managed like products — by people and teams with specialized, journey-dedicated roles who continually research, measure, optimize, and orchestrate the experience.

  • Three Levels of Pain Points in Customer Experience

    Pain points are problems that occur at the different levels of the customer experience: interaction level, customer-journey level, or relationship level.

  • Collaboration in the Omnichannel Experience

    Collaboration is one of the 5 key components of omnichannel user experience. Collaboration between normally disparate devices or channels creates new ways to interact.

  • Asset Mapping for Experience Consistency

    Asset maps display and organize the screens and elements users encounter along workflows and journeys. They provide a systematic way of analyzing the consistency of an organization’s experience across channels.

  • A Framework for CX Transformation: How to Operationalize CX at Scale

    To deliver high-quality omnichannel experiences, companies must develop an operational ecosystem that enables crossfunctional collaboration and quick reaction to customers’ needs.

  • Getting Started with Journey Mapping: 27 Tips from Practitioners

    Set yourself up for journey-mapping success by educating yourself on the basics, defining objectives, building a crossfunctional team, collaborating on the map, and optimizing your presentation.

  • Companies on Social Media: 6 Types of User Interactions with Business

    Users rely on social media to find out about new products or companies, conduct research, engage with content, make purchases, and seek customer support.

  • Refine, Remodel, Rebuild: 3 Strategies for Experience Improvement

    To improve customer experience, solutions range from low to high investment and impact, based on budget, risk tolerance, readiness, and unmet needs.

  • A Guide to Service-Blueprinting Workshops

    Service-blueprinting workshops require thoughtful planning and hands-on facilitation.

  • Orchestration in the Omnichannel Experience

    One of the 5 key components of a successful omnichannel user experience, orchestration creates a personalized customer journey.

  • Service Blueprinting: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    The structure and format of a collaborative spreadsheet makes it an effective tool for virtual service blueprinting.

  • How to Run a Journey-Mapping Workshop: A Step-by-Step Case Study

    How to design a journey-mapping workshop that leads participants through current-state assumption mapping, pain-point identification, and future-state visioning.

  • Journey-Mapping Approaches: 2 Critical Decisions To Make Before You Begin

    Before beginning any journey-mapping initiative, teams must decide between (1) a current-state or future-state map, and (2) an assumption-first or research-first approach. A hybrid approach for each decision works well for most teams.

  • Service Blueprinting: Fails and Fixes

    The most common pain points with service blueprinting are setting expectations, determining scope, and communicating insights, according to 97 UX professionals.

  • 7 Ways to Analyze a Customer-Journey Map

    Evaluate your journey map to identify low and high points, failures to set expectations, unnecessary or too long steps, channel transitions, and moments of truth. Use this information to find opportunities for improving the journey.

  • Foundational UX Workshop Activities

    There are 7 activities that act as a foundation for every UX exercise during a workshop or collaborative team meeting. By understanding these, you can create almost any other exercise you need.

  • Service Blueprinting: Top Questions Answered

    Service blueprints are the primary tool for service design, but practitioners often misunderstand how they relate to journey mapping, who should be involved in the process, and how to sell their value to the organization.

  • Service Blueprinting in Practice: Who, When, What

    UX practitioners associate the term “service blueprinting” with an artifact, framework, or collaborative tool. Those surveyed used service blueprints early on or near the end of the product-design lifecycle.

  • Good Customer Experience Demands Organizational Fluidity

    Old processes and technologies can keep established organizations from creating exceptional user experiences and achieving future growth.