UX Teams Articles & Videos

  • UX-Maturity Stage 1: Absent

    A company at this stage is either oblivious to UX or believes it doesn't apply to what it does.

  • Four Factors in UX Maturity

    Improving UX maturity requires growth and evolution across 4 high-level factors: strategy, culture, process, and outcomes.

  • UX Team Structure and Reporting

    UX staff can be organized in two ways: centralized or decentralized (or a hybrid). The teams can also report into different parts of the bigger organization. There is currently no single best practice for these team-structure questions.

  • Derailed Design Critiques: Tactics for Getting Back on Track

    Feedback during design critiques can be filled with hypothetical scenarios and unactionable suggestions. The right facilitation techniques help stakeholders and team members stay on track while still feeling heard.

  • UX Team Staff Size Relative to Development Staff

    We investigated current trends in design-team ratios, specifically: What's the typical number of designers and researchers in an organization relative to the number of developers?

  • First Diverge, Then Converge During UX Workshops

    A general technique that's helpful in many kinds of UX workshops and design ideation is to first have team members work independently to create diverging ideas and solutions. Then, as a separate step, everybody works together to converge on the final outcome.

  • Design Thinking: The Learner’s Journey

    As an individual learns design thinking, they go through 4 learning phases: newcomer, adopter, leader, and grandmaster.

  • The State of Design Teams: Structure, Alignment and Impact

    A survey of 557 UX and design professionals reveals themes in the structure, size, alignment, and impact of design teams.

  • The 6 Steps to Roadmapping

    To create a roadmap, inputs are gathered and clustered into themes, then prioritized and visualized. This article covers 6 key steps to roadmapping that can be applied to any scope or industry.

  • 3 Steps for Getting Started with DesignOps

    Treat your goal to implement DesignOps like a design problem: Collect evidence that demonstrates where the true design-team challenges lie and align DesignOps efforts accordingly.

  • Typical Designer–to–Developer and Researcher–to–Designer Ratios

    In 2020, the most typical researcher–to–designer–to–developer ratio reported was 1:5:50. Beware, however, of using role ratios alone to measure teams’ maturity or impact.

  • How Can UX Professionals Balance a Range of Skills as They Build Their Careers

    Advice on how to balance breadth and depth of skill within the many different subdisciplines of the user experience profession. You can't be great at everything, so how do you choose where to specialize in your UX career?

  • Skill Mapping: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    A collaborative spreadsheet is an efficient tool for evaluating skills of UX team members and creating an overall team shape.

  • Can People with Established Careers in Another Field Become UX Professionals?

    Will the UX field value people who change careers from another field and want to become user experience professionals? Will the field still value them if they're a bit older, and how do they compete with fresh graduates?

  • The UX Maturity Model

    Is the UX Maturity model from 15 years ago still valid, and can companies stay at the highest level, the user-centered corporation?

  • Crafting Product-Specific Design Principles to Support Better Decision Making

    Product design principles (or, in short, design principles) are value statements that frame design decisions and support consistency in decision making across teams working on the same product or service.

  • Remote Work and Play: The Most Important UX Challenge

    At the virtual UX Conference, Jakob Nielsen was asked "What's the most interesting UX topic at the moment?" Answer: better support for remote lifestyles.

  • Service Blueprinting: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    The structure and format of a collaborative spreadsheet makes it an effective tool for virtual service blueprinting.

  • Is There Value in Having Others than the Designers Work on UX?

    Some designers feel that they know everything about UX, including how to do research, so is there any value in having others contribute, whether dedicated user researchers or external consultants?

  • UX Portfolios: Preparing for Interviews

    Your portfolio must play two roles when you apply for a UX job: first persuade the hiring manager to bring you in for an interview (or even a first screening call) and then support you during the interview itself.

  • UX Team Structure and Reporting

    UX staff can be organized in two ways: centralized or decentralized (or a hybrid). The teams can also report into different parts of the bigger organization. There is currently no single best practice for these team-structure questions.

  • UX Team Staff Size Relative to Development Staff

    We investigated current trends in design-team ratios, specifically: What's the typical number of designers and researchers in an organization relative to the number of developers?

  • First Diverge, Then Converge During UX Workshops

    A general technique that's helpful in many kinds of UX workshops and design ideation is to first have team members work independently to create diverging ideas and solutions. Then, as a separate step, everybody works together to converge on the final outcome.

  • How Can UX Professionals Balance a Range of Skills as They Build Their Careers

    Advice on how to balance breadth and depth of skill within the many different subdisciplines of the user experience profession. You can't be great at everything, so how do you choose where to specialize in your UX career?

  • Can People with Established Careers in Another Field Become UX Professionals?

    Will the UX field value people who change careers from another field and want to become user experience professionals? Will the field still value them if they're a bit older, and how do they compete with fresh graduates?

  • The UX Maturity Model

    Is the UX Maturity model from 15 years ago still valid, and can companies stay at the highest level, the user-centered corporation?

  • Remote Work and Play: The Most Important UX Challenge

    At the virtual UX Conference, Jakob Nielsen was asked "What's the most interesting UX topic at the moment?" Answer: better support for remote lifestyles.

  • Is There Value in Having Others than the Designers Work on UX?

    Some designers feel that they know everything about UX, including how to do research, so is there any value in having others contribute, whether dedicated user researchers or external consultants?

  • UX Portfolios: Preparing for Interviews

    Your portfolio must play two roles when you apply for a UX job: first persuade the hiring manager to bring you in for an interview (or even a first screening call) and then support you during the interview itself.

  • How to Grow a UX Career and Advance Your User-Experience Expertise

    At the Virtual UX Conference, Jakob Nielsen answered audience questions on how to advance through various career stages: before getting your first job, and being successful as you grow your user experience skills and expertise.

  • Design Principles 101

    Design principles are value statements that guide designers in making the right tradeoff-type decisions in UX design contexts.

  • What Makes a Virtual Conference Work?

    Most online events are boring and people tune out, and yet the Virtual UX Conference was a success with strong audience engagement and high feedback scores. Why?

  • Tools for Running Remote UX Workshops

    How to maximize team participation and the value of the outcome when running a UX workshop remotely. Different platforms have different benefits and downsides, so choose depending on your circumstances and needs.

  • What Makes an Effective UX Leader?

    We asked a group of user experience professionals what makes for efficient UX leadership in their experience. Answers differed, but included a lot of soft skills.

  • Retrospectives 102: The Sailboat Method

    After each sprint, the team should have a retrospective session to identify what went well or not so well. The sailboat metaphor is a nice way to structure such retrospectives.

  • Communicating UX to Your Colleagues and Organization

    When the organization and your coworkers don't understand UX, we have to apply our own methods to communicate more clearly with the target audience for our work.

  • UX Workshop Energizers and Icebreakers

    3 quick game-like activities you can use with participants in a UX workshop to get the team energized and ready to be creative and productive before turning to the real work of the meeting.

  • Kickoff Meetings for Team Alignment Before Starting UX Projects

    Design and development projects are highly multidisciplinary with team members with a variety of skills and vocabulary use, sometimes with conflicting definitions of terms. A kickoff meeting can make sure everybody is on the proverbial same page regarding all the team members' skills and responsibilities.

  • Transitioning from UI to UX

    Anybody who's already a good UI designer and can make great screens, has a big head start to becoming a good UX designer, but more is required to excel in this expanded role.

  • The "Parking Lot" in UX Workshops: Friend or Foe?

    To maintain focus in a UX workshop, set aside ideas in a "parking lot" if they diverge from the stated agenda. Parked ideas should be discussed later when they won't slow the team's momentum in addressing the meeting's main topic. Here are 3 guidelines for making the most of a parking lot.

  • UX-Maturity Stage 1: Absent

    A company at this stage is either oblivious to UX or believes it doesn't apply to what it does.

  • Four Factors in UX Maturity

    Improving UX maturity requires growth and evolution across 4 high-level factors: strategy, culture, process, and outcomes.

  • Derailed Design Critiques: Tactics for Getting Back on Track

    Feedback during design critiques can be filled with hypothetical scenarios and unactionable suggestions. The right facilitation techniques help stakeholders and team members stay on track while still feeling heard.

  • Design Thinking: The Learner’s Journey

    As an individual learns design thinking, they go through 4 learning phases: newcomer, adopter, leader, and grandmaster.

  • The State of Design Teams: Structure, Alignment and Impact

    A survey of 557 UX and design professionals reveals themes in the structure, size, alignment, and impact of design teams.

  • The 6 Steps to Roadmapping

    To create a roadmap, inputs are gathered and clustered into themes, then prioritized and visualized. This article covers 6 key steps to roadmapping that can be applied to any scope or industry.

  • 3 Steps for Getting Started with DesignOps

    Treat your goal to implement DesignOps like a design problem: Collect evidence that demonstrates where the true design-team challenges lie and align DesignOps efforts accordingly.

  • Typical Designer–to–Developer and Researcher–to–Designer Ratios

    In 2020, the most typical researcher–to–designer–to–developer ratio reported was 1:5:50. Beware, however, of using role ratios alone to measure teams’ maturity or impact.

  • Skill Mapping: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    A collaborative spreadsheet is an efficient tool for evaluating skills of UX team members and creating an overall team shape.

  • Crafting Product-Specific Design Principles to Support Better Decision Making

    Product design principles (or, in short, design principles) are value statements that frame design decisions and support consistency in decision making across teams working on the same product or service.

  • Service Blueprinting: A Digital Template for Remote Teams

    The structure and format of a collaborative spreadsheet makes it an effective tool for virtual service blueprinting.

  • DesignOps Maturity: Low in Most Organizations

    In a survey of 557 design and UX practitioners, organizations only did 22% of recommended DesignOps efforts, did not have DesignOps-dedicated roles, and had low DesignOps maturity overall.

  • DesignOps: What's the Point? How Practitioners Define DesignOps Value

    Practitioners define DesignOps based on the value it provides for their team or organization. Most practitioners think of DesignOps as a way to standardize and optimize processes, enable and support designers, or scale design.

  • Applying UX-Workshop Techniques to the Hiring Process

    Create an effective hiring process by borrowing techniques used in UX workshops.

  • Workshop Facilitation 101

    By following a set of simple facilitation principles and using standard tools and activities, anybody can grow into a confident workshop facilitator.

  • Remote UX Work: Guidelines and Resources

    Even though in-person UX sessions are typically ideal, sometimes budget or travel restrictions necessitate remote UX work. This article presents guidelines for remote user research, UX workshops or presentations, and collaboration.

  • UX Workshops vs. Meetings: What's the Difference?

    Meetings are for sharing information; workshops are for solving a problem or reaching an actionable goal. We compare the differences in purpose, scope, length, structure, and preparation time for workshops and meetings.

  • Incorporating UX Work into Your Agile Backlog

    Three different backlog models enable teams to keep track of UX work in their Agile processes. Each model comes with pros and cons.

  • Where Should UX Report? 3 Common Models for UX Teams and How to Choose Among Them

    Design and user research usually report to either a centralized UX team, a product team, or a hybrid of these. There are clear benefits and drawbacks to each model.

  • Parking Lots in UX Meetings and Workshops

    A parking lot captures unrelated questions or out-of-scope conversation during UX meetings or workshops in order to keep the discussion focused and maintain momentum.